Matt

/Matt South

About Matt South

Matt is a penetration tester from Kansas City, MO. He specializes in web and mobile application testing, but loves all things security. Matt's favorite types of exploits to find are business logic flaws that an automated scanner would miss.

HoneyPi – An easy honeypot for a Raspberry Pi

HoneyPi - an easy honeypot for a Raspberry Pi It is astonishingly easy as an attacker to move around on most networks undetected. Let's face it, unless your organization is big enough to have full packet capture with some expensive IDS, you will likely have no idea if there is an attacker on your network. [...]

By | August 22nd, 2017|Categories: InfoSec|0 Comments

EXE Hijacking in Git Bash for Windows

TLDR; Git Bash for Windows 1.x will execute any file named "git.exe" in the current directory when accessing the Windows context menu Discovery I was researching some old DLL hijacking vectors recently. Specifically, I was looking at the Metasploit module exploit/windows/browser/webdav_dll_hijacker. I wanted to see if this old 2010 exploit would work with Windows 8 [...]

By | October 30th, 2016|Categories: Vulnerabilities|1 Comment

What is DLL Hijacking?

DLL Hijacking is a way for attackers to execute unexpected code on your machine. This means that if an attacker can get a file on your machine (by social engineering, remote control, etc.)  that file could be executed when the user runs an application that is vulnerable to DLL Hijacking. To understand how it works, you [...]

By | October 19th, 2016|Categories: InfoSec|Tags: |0 Comments

Can’t Hack a Hacker: Reverse Engineering a Discovered ATM Skimmer

Can't Hack a Hacker: Reverse Engineering a Discovered ATM Skimmer Background When traveling, Elizabeth and I are always a little bit extra cautious; we hide money in special belts, we carry emergency cards in 3 separate places, we never withdraw more than $100 from the ATM. One precaution Elizabeth always takes, is covering [...]

By | March 31st, 2016|Categories: InfoSec|64 Comments

Practical Guide to exploiting the unquoted service path vulnerability in Windows

Practical Guide to exploiting the unquoted service path vulnerability in Windows What is the unquoted service path vulnerability in Windows? When a service in Windows is started, Windows has to try to find it. Usually, this is an easy task because the path is well-defined and contained in quotation marks. Like this example [...]

By | September 10th, 2015|Categories: InfoSec|3 Comments